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Demo APOSDLE Prototype 1

Demo of the First APOSDLE Prototype.

First Prototype APOSDLE

This document reports on the “First Prototype APOSDLE”, an available prototype system which is running on dedicated project servers. This document describes the main features of this prototype, giving also insight into development issues without the need of having access to the actual prototype.

According the Description of Work the First Prototype APOSDLE is subdivided into five Deliverables (D I.2, D II.2, D III.2, D IV.2, D V.2). This document combines all these deliverables into a single document, thus making it easier to access information about the prototype in its entirety. However, each deliverable denotes exactly one chapter in the document:

Work & Modelling Tools – WP I

Learning Tools – WP II

Collaboration Tools – WP III

Platform (Integrated Knowledge Structure Part) – WP IV

Platform (Semantic Spaces Part) – WP V

In addition to these work package specific chapters, there are two chapters which are common to all work packages, one illustrating a guided tour through the prototype from the view of an end user, another one giving a brief summary of the underlying system architecture as a reference to the individual software components.

The overall objective of the first prototype is to provide a first integration of the prototypes from individual work packages into one APOSDLE environment to be used by (software) engineers while working, learning, and collaborating on issues regarding requirements elicitation in their work environment.

The development follows a rapid prototype approach, a process of quickly putting together a working model in order to test various aspects of a design, illustrate ideas or features and gather early user feedback. The idea behind producing first prototypes quickly is to be able to improve the APOSDLE concepts and methods with feedback from the application partners as soon as possible – thereby producing better final results.

This first prototype is not designed to be embedded into the actual work environment of end users (our application partners), such as interfacing with existing file services, legacy databases or e-mail repositories. It uses one predetermined application/learning domain: Requirements Elicitation (i.e. how can APOSDLE support people who perform requirements elicitation). This includes that the first APOSDLE prototype is an environment which supports the work of a requirements engineer or project manager, supports their learning needs and their collaboration situations. Predominantly knowledge about RESCUE, CityUniversity’s research-oriented requirements process, is delivered within the first prototype based on existing training materials.

Overall this first prototype is an important milestone in the APOSDLE project. It will be used for the formative evaluation process where a small group of users will be selected to use the prototype under laboratory conditions.

First Prototype APOSDLE

This document reports on the “First Prototype APOSDLE”, an available prototype system which is running on dedicated project servers. This document describes the main features of this prototype, giving also insight into development issues without the need of having access to the actual prototype.

According the Description of Work the First Prototype APOSDLE is subdivided into five Deliverables (D I.2, D II.2, D III.2, D IV.2, D V.2). This document combines all these deliverables into a single document, thus making it easier to access information about the prototype in its entirety. However, each deliverable denotes exactly one chapter in the document:

Work & Modelling Tools – WP I

Learning Tools – WP II

Collaboration Tools – WP III

Platform (Integrated Knowledge Structure Part) – WP IV

Platform (Semantic Spaces Part) – WP V

In addition to these work package specific chapters, there are two chapters which are common to all work packages, one illustrating a guided tour through the prototype from the view of an end user, another one giving a brief summary of the underlying system architecture as a reference to the individual software components.

The overall objective of the first prototype is to provide a first integration of the prototypes from individual work packages into one APOSDLE environment to be used by (software) engineers while working, learning, and collaborating on issues regarding requirements elicitation in their work environment.

The development follows a rapid prototype approach, a process of quickly putting together a working model in order to test various aspects of a design, illustrate ideas or features and gather early user feedback. The idea behind producing first prototypes quickly is to be able to improve the APOSDLE concepts and methods with feedback from the application partners as soon as possible – thereby producing better final results.

This first prototype is not designed to be embedded into the actual work environment of end users (our application partners), such as interfacing with existing file services, legacy databases or e-mail repositories. It uses one predetermined application/learning domain: Requirements Elicitation (i.e. how can APOSDLE support people who perform requirements elicitation). This includes that the first APOSDLE prototype is an environment which supports the work of a requirements engineer or project manager, supports their learning needs and their collaboration situations. Predominantly knowledge about RESCUE, CityUniversity’s research-oriented requirements process, is delivered within the first prototype based on existing training materials.

Overall this first prototype is an important milestone in the APOSDLE project. It will be used for the formative evaluation process where a small group of users will be selected to use the prototype under laboratory conditions.

Dissemination, Standardisation and Exploitation Report

This document gives an overview of the activities the APOSDLE project consortium has undertaken in the first project year (March 2006 – February 2007) in the areas of dissemination, standardisation and exploitation. Moreover, we give a plan on how these activities will continue in the remainder of the project with an emphasis on the next two years.

The purpose of the dissemination activities in Work Package (WP) 07 is to create awareness about project results in all important target groups and constituencies. Main efforts have been within the scientific community and with related EU projects to create awareness about the APOSDLE project and to disseminate the very first scientific results. Highlights include the organisation of the I-Know conference and special tracks, organisation of the EC-TEL conference and the founding of Pro-LC, the Professional Learning Cluster.

Industry and businesses will be targeted more strongly after the first APOSDLE demonstrator is available and the application scenarios are more fully developed. The means of dissemination include press releases and electronic news updates (to be started in March 2007), membership of the project in Pro-LC and Prolearn, organisation of and participation in events, journal and conference publications, as well as demonstrations and industry stands.

A further objective of WP 07 is to promote the adoption of standards and the awareness of standardisation activities in all the technological aspects relevant to APOSDLE, and to encourage the engagement with standardisation efforts, by contributing to ongoing standardisation forums, and disseminating specifications. The standardisation activity performed in WP 07 during the early stage of the project has focused mainly on adoption of standards and awareness of standardisation activities across several technological areas of the project in order to ensure the usage of the latest updates and advancements of the standardisation bodies into the design and realisation of the APOSDLE system, right from the beginning. This deliverable reports a summary of the main ongoing and planned standardisation activities within the APOSDLE project, including the plan for a more structured living document (based on WiKi technology) that monitors the progress in important standardisation activities and general technological developments of interest to the APOSDLE project.

Finally, an exploitation plan is presented. The overall objectives of this plan are:

  • Early demonstrations to industrial partners and small enterprises to create awareness for the APOSDLE idea and application
  • Quickly turn technical project results into products
  • Research results can be integrated into existing products and services or represent the base of new innovative product or service if possible

We present several planned activities of the partners that will bring us closer to these objectives. These include planned contacts to existing customers and network partners, and a feeding of certain ideas into the product development cycles.

Formative Evaluation Guidelines and Plan

The contribution of this deliverable is twofold: First, it presents guidelines for development partners. These guidelines provide the basis for formative usability evaluation during the first iterative development phase until month 12. The target audience for these guidelines are development partners, especially those that implement tools with a user interface (e.g. the APOSDLE toolbar) as the guidelines focus on usability aspects that are relevant when users interact with a tool. Other aspects that are also important, such as testing of precision and recall of the query results, corpora selection or model testing, but not directly related to usability issues need to be considered during development but are not covered in the guidelines.

Secondly, this deliverable provides the framework for formative and summative evaluation tasks throughout the project, in the form of an evaluation matrix. The framework is provided for all of the evaluation tasks in the project to provide the context for the more specific formative evaluation tasks that will take place in months 13 – 15.

This first formative evaluation phase is in two main parts. Firstly we will test for core usability issues, assuring that users are able to complete APOSDLE core tasks as described in the use cases. The focus here will be on evaluating overall effectiveness of the interaction, overall efficiency of the interaction, overall user satisfaction and checking if usability standards are met. Secondly we will evaluate the prototype for scenario compliance. Here, the focus is on checking for requirements and specification compliance, observing whether features of the prototype are compliant with requirements specified in the DVI.2 deliverable. The outcome of this document is a simple framework for more detailed design of the first formative evaluation phase.

Workplace Learning Study

The goal of the workplace learning study was to examine actual workplace learning behaviour by knowledge workers in order to find out how a new application as APOSDLE can fit into existing work contexts. Another goal was to detect bottlenecks and apportunities to be addressed in the future.

The study consisted of two phases. In the first phase, data about workplace learning was collected at the partner organizations. Several data collection methods were used, including observation of workplace learning, interviews and a learning diary. 46 persons from four organisations were involved. Data was collected in 97 observation and interview sessions, and from 70 learning diary entries. In total, the data set consisted of 175 learning events experienced at the workplace. In the second phase, data was collected by means of a questionnaire for a sample of 104 workers from a wider range of European organizations in order to validate the results from the first phase.

Main results, relevant for APOSDLE, of both phases of the study are:

  • APOSDLE relevance
    • Key finding: Computer based workplace learning is ubiquitous
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: APOSDLE addresses a phenomenon that is widespread over many different organizations.
    • Key finding: Learning is currently overall reasonably successful, though bottlenecks are present.
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: There is room for improvement in current practices, in particular in solving specific bottlenecks
  • APOSDLE general approach
    • Key finding: Workplace learning is strongly driven by work tasks, but learning driven by curiosity is also present.
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: With the task related approach to learning support, APOSDLE is right on target and fits into current practice. In addition, room must be present for not directly task related learning.
    • Key finding: Most learning events are not very complex and consists of a few steps only
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: No need for lengthy course-like learning support. It should be brief and to the point.
  • Learner support: interpersonal help seeking
    • Key finding: When seeking help, interpersonal help seeking using face-to-face contact is used most often.
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: APOSDLE needs to research ways to replicate, replace or supplement face-to-face contact. It should either have its own facilities for interpersonal help seeking or fit seamlessly and effortless into current tools and practices.
    • Key finding: There is some evidence that current communication facilities used most often (email and telephone) are not sufficient to support learning needs: Bottlenecks are much more frequently reported from the expert role and often relate to missing support for the expert role (like forgetting), some of the bottlenecks reported relate to media characteristics.
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: There is room for improvement in current communication media facilities to support interpersonal help seeking. APOSDLE should offer facilities that better support the expert role in knowledge exchange.
  • Learner support: seeking help from written material
    • Key finding: When seeking help from written material, digital sources are used most.
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: Providing easy access to company digital sources is important.
  • Influence of organisational setting
    • Key finding: Several key variables that could influence the fielding of APOSDLE (what drives learning, what kind of help people seek, what is learned) are not or only weakly dependent on the organizational setting (company size, type of knowledge work, number of years in the job).
    • Consequence for APOSDLE: The prospective APOSDLE tools can be fairly general, only limited tailoring to the specific setting may be needed.

The results of this study provide a rich source of information regarding workplace learning in knowledge work, and will be used to inform visioning and requirements gathering activities for the future APOSDLE system.

Use Cases & Application Requirements 1 (First Prototype)

This document provides a specification of use cases and requirements for the first APOSDLE prototype, which will be delivered in month 12. Use case definitions have been written using terminology from the agreed project glossary, and have been linked both to the requirements identified by the project’s application partners, and to the mock-up which has formed a basis for discussion amongst technical partners. The development of this document has therefore played an important role in creating links between a number of different on-going activities within the project.

The document presents:

·A use case specification for the first prototype, in the form of a use case diagram and associated use case definitions (see sections 2 and 3)

·A list of requirements relevant to the first prototype (see section 4).

·An agreed project glossary (see section 5)

·A mock-up of the first prototype (see Appendix A).

This document builds on other materials produced within WPVI, and in particular on:

·The vision, context model and definitions provided in deliverable D6.1 and

·Output from the APOSDLE project creativity workshop

It will also form a basis for later deliverables, including D4.1 - the Software Design and Development Plan for the first prototype – in which the underlying architecture and models to be used in the first prototype will be specified.

Training Activities 1 (Plan)

This document is aimed at illustrating the components of the training plan for APOSDLE as well as a first overview of the training needs and offers mentioned by the APOSDLE consortium. Moreover, this deliverable should induce a discussion about further extensions or adaptations concerning APOSDLE training activities.

For those partners who have additional training needs or offers, this document acts as a starting point or a trigger for a future submission. Related to the core ideas of APOSDLE we are willing to integrate the philosophy of workplace learning in the APOSDLE training activities as well. That causes another problem in the panning process of the trainings as the availability of project results has to be considered in two different dimensions: On the one hand there will be content based on new knowledge and prototypes, on the other hand APOSDLE will bring up a new didactic dimension we also want to use for training in order to work in an authentic way.

The structure of this deliverable is as follows: At first the components of the training plan (internal and external training) are presented and explained. Then the illustration of the currently identified training needs and offers are depicted in an integrated table. To better understand this summary an explanation is given and the process for the next steps in the work package “Training” is described. Moreover the training plan form which has been distributed among the APOSDLE consortium is attached in the appendix.

APOSDLE Website & Flyer

The first deliverable in the task of disseminating APOSDLE project results to the public was the creation of an APOSDLE website and a flyer.

The new APOSDLE website was published on May 24, 2006 at http://www.aposdle.org. It provides extensive information about the APOSDLE project and the central ideas behind the APOSDLE approach, and should serve as the primary source of information for the public. The website will be continuously updated with the public results and publications to be produced.

The APOSDLE flyer was created as a complementary instrument for creating public awareness for the project. It was developed as an “eye catcher” which will mainly be distributed at meetings and conferences. The flyer presents the main ideas of the project in an accessible and easy-to-read form.

APOSDLE Scope and Boundaries

This document provides a baseline for the APOSDLE project’s scope and boundaries. Since the APOSDLE prototypes within year 1 will be focused on the domain of requirements engineering, this deliverable explains and illustrates the APOSDLE vision, the context model and the key concepts using this domain.

Within the first part of this deliverable the APOSDLE vision is presented in the form of three scenarios. The support APOSDLE aims to provide for learners, experts and workers is illustrated using the example of a requirements engineer. Based on the APOSDLE description of work this vision was developed by the Know-Center. During the APOSDLE kick-off meeting it was presented, discussed and agreed by all partners.

The second part of this deliverable identifies actors (both human and technical) whose work may be designed or re-designed through work carried out in the APOSDLE project in an APOSDLE context model. It is designed to give an overview of the scope of the project’s influence. This model was developed through work in work package VI on establishing user requirements. As part of this work, staff from CityUniversity met with staff from each of the application partners (CCI, CNM, EADS and ISN). During these meetings, four separate partner-specific context models were constructed and discussed. Following the meetings, actor roles and relationships from each of the application partners were generalised to create a generic context model reflecting common patterns of interaction across all partners.

Within the final part of this deliverable key project concepts and terms are defined in a glossary. Definitions were provided by the relevant work package leaders, and have been validated by all project partners. Illustrative examples are provided from the domain of requirements engineering, which is to be the focus of the project’s first prototypes. Finally, for key concepts their influence on the APOSDLE goals (specifically for year 1) is discussed.

The boundaries and definitions set out in this document are seen as first cut definitions. The project vision, context model and glossary will evolve during the course of the project. However, the versions provided here have been agreed upon by all partners, and as such, provide an important starting point for the development of a common orientation and cross-project consensus regarding the aims of the project.

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